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Endoscopic Procedures



Preparation for Your Endoscopic Procedure

Prior to your endoscopic procedure, follow all directions given to you by the physician performing your procedure. If you are having a colonoscopy and are having problems taking the laxative, call your physician. It is important that you complete the laxative preparation if possible. This ensures a clean colon for the examination. A laxative is not given for an upper endoscopic procedure.

Arrive at the hospital at least one hour prior to the time scheduled for your procedure. Wear simple, loose fitting clothing. Women should not wear pantyhose, girdles or high-heeled shoes. Wedding rings may be worn, but please leave all other jewelry and valuables at home.

Notify your physician if:

  • you have diabetes;
  • you are taking aspirin products or blood thinners;
  • you develop any physical problems such as a sore throat, fever or cold prior to your procedure.

Bring a list of your current medications with you. You will be asked to sign a consent form before any medications are given to you. If the patient is a minor, the consent form must be signed by a parent or legal guardian.

 

Following Your Endoscopic Procedure

It is very important that you arrange to have someone that can drive you home accompany you the day of the procedure. It is advisable that you go home and nap following the procedure. You may want to eat when you get home.

After a colonoscopy with biopsies or polyp removal, it is normal to have a small amount of rectal bleeding. If it is more than "spotting" or if it persists, you should call the physician who performed the procedure. If you should develop or experience unusually or persistent abdominal pain or fever, your physician should be notified immediately.

After an upper endoscopy, it is normal to have minor throat irritation. Remember, it is normal to feel a little dizzy or sleepy for several hours following your procedure. Some people experience mild amnesia from the sedation. Because of this, your doctor may want to discuss his or her findings with your companion or family member. It is common for patients to forget speaking with their physician after the procedure.

Your physician will usually have the findings from any polyps or tissue taken in two working days. Wait at least 24 hours after you have returned home to drive or operate any equipment, drink any alcoholic beverages, take any sleeping pills or sign any important documents.

 

Esophago Gastro Duodenoscopy (EGD)

After careful medical examination, your doctor may recommend that you have an esophago gastro duodenoscopy or EGD procedure. During this procedure a flexible scope is passed through your mouth and throat into the upper digestive tract. Your doctor will examine the lining of your esophagus, stomach and the initial portion of the small intestine to look for any abnormalities. The procedure will take 15 to 30 minutes.

Prior to the procedure you will be asked to remove any dentures or eyeglasses. You will be asked to sign a consent form authorizing the doctor to perform this procedure. Please let the doctor and nurse know if you are allergic to any medications. Bring a list of your current medications with you.

An IV will be placed in your arm prior to the procedure. This will enable the doctor to administer medication that will make you sleepy. You will receive a spray to numb your throat that will wear off within an hour. You will lie on your left side during the procedure. The doctor will place a small mouthpiece between your teeth to protect your teeth and the endoscope. You will be able to breathe normally.

Next, the doctor will help you swallow a flexible scope. He or she will examine the lining of the esophagus, stomach and upper portion of the small intestine. A tiny bit of tissue may be taken for microscopic examination.

Many people do not recall the procedure due to the medication. After the procedure, you will be drowsy and may even sleep for a short time. If this is an outpatient procedure, you will remain in the department for at least one hour after the procedure is completed. The doctor will discuss the findings with you and your family members. You will also be given written instructions for home care upon discharge.

 

Colonoscopy

After careful medical examination, your doctor may recommend that you have a colonoscopy. During this procedure, a lubricated, flexible scope is introduced in the rectum and passes through your large intestine. this procedure allows the doctor to examine your rectum, sigmoid, descending, transverse and ascending colon and cecum to identify any abnormalities. The procedure takes about thirty to sixty minutes.

Prior to your procedure, you will be asked to sign a consent form authorizing the doctor to perform this procedure. Please let the doctor and the nurse know if you are allergic to any medications. Also bring a list of your current medications with you. An IV will be started in your arm. This will allow the doctor to administer the medication that will make you sleepy.

During the procedure, you will lie on your back or left side. As the doctor inserts the lubricated scope into your rectum, you may experience some gas or crampy feeling. Slow, deep breathing will help to ease this feeling. A tiny piece of tissue or polyps may be removed for microscopic examination.

Many people do not recall the procedure because of the medication. You will probably be drowsy for a short time after the procedure. If this is an outpatient procedure, you will remain in the department for at least one hour after the procedure is completed. the doctor will discuss the findings with you and your family members. You will be given written instructions for home care upon discharge.

 

Sigmoidoscopy

After careful medical examination, your doctor may recommend that you have a flexible sigmoidoscopy. During this procedure, a lubricated, flexible scope is introduced into your rectum and passed through the lower part of your large intestine. This procedure allows the doctor to examine your rectum and sigmoid colon to identify any abnormalities. It takes about 15 minutes to perform.

When you arrive for your scheduled sigmoidoscopy, you will be asked to sign a consent form authorizing the doctor to perform the procedure. Please let the doctor and GI nurse know if you are allergic to any medications. Bring a list of your current medications with you.

During this procedure, you will lie on your side. When the doctor inserts the lubricated scope into your rectum, he or she will examine the lower part of your colon. You may experience some gas, cramping or the feeling that your bowels have to move. Slow, deep breaths will help to ease this feeling. A tiny piece of tissue may be taken for microscopic examination.

After the procedure is completed, the doctor will discuss his findings with you, the nurse and your family members. You will also be given written instructions for home care upon your discharge.

 

Bronchoscopy

After careful medical examination, your doctor may recommend that you have a fiber-optic bronchoscopy. During this procedure, a flexible scope is passed through your nose or mouth to view the inside of your lungs. The procedure allows your doctor is able to examine your throat, vocal chords and lungs. It takes about 15 to 30 minutes.

The preparation for this procedure may vary depending upon your doctor's orders. It is important that you do not eat or drink anything from the time specified by your doctor until after the exam has been completed. All dentures and eye wear must be removed prior to the procedure. Also, make sure you empty your bladder and move your bowels if necessary.

You will be asked to sign a consent form authorizing the doctor to perform the procedure. Please let the doctor or endoscopy nurse know if you are allergic to any medications. Bring a list of your medications with you. To help you relax, you may receive injections prior to the examination. The doctor may order a respiratory therapist to give a breathing treatment to numb your throat. An IV will be started in your arm prior to the procedure, so the doctor may administer medication to make you sleepy. You will be asked to gargle with a numbing solution. The doctor will spray your nose and throat to make them feel numb.

The doctor will insert the flexible scope through your nostril or mouth and into your lungs. Coughing is a normal reaction at this point. You will be able to breathe normally. A tiny bit of tissue may be taken for microscopic examination.

A nurse will check your blood pressure, pulse and respiration periodically after the procedure. Do not eat or drink anything until the nurse allows you to do so. If this is an outpatient procedure, you will remain in the department for at least one to four hours after the procedure is completed. The doctor will discuss his or her findings with you, the endoscopy nurse and your family members. You will be given written instructions for home care upon your discharge.

 

ERCP - Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

After careful medical examination, your doctor may recommend that an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or ERCP be performed. An ERCP can be a valuable examination for the diagnosis of many diseases of the pancreas, bile ducts, liver and gallbladder.

An ERCP allows the doctor to perform necessary treatments such as enlarging a bile duct, inserting a stent or drain into the duct or taking a tiny piece of tissue for microscopic examination. The procedure takes about an hour.

During an ERCP, a flexible scope is passed through the mouth, esophagus and stomach into the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. The doctor finds the opening where the bile and pancreatic ducts empty into the small intestine and passes a small plastic tube in the opening through the scope. X-ray dye is then injected through the tube into the duct and the doctor is able to determine if treatment is necessary.

Prior to the procedure, dentures, eyeglasses and contacts must be removed. You will be asked to sign a consent form that authorizes the doctor to perform the procedure. Be sure to tell the doctor and the nurse if you are allergic to any medicines, x-ray dyes or iodine products. You may receive one or two injections about one hour prior to the procedure. An IV will also be started in your arm so the doctor may administer medicine to make you sleepy. The doctor may also spray your throat or ask you to gargle with numbing medicine.

You will be asked to lie on your left side on an x-ray table and a small plastic mouthpiece will be placed between your teeth. The doctor will help you to swallow the flexible scope. When the scope is in the duodenum, you will be assisted in turning onto your abdomen, keeping your head turned to the right. You may experience some abdominal fullness or mild discomfort as the doctor injects air or x-ray dye through the tube, but it should not be painful.

After the scope is removed, you may be asked to move into a different position so more x-rays can be taken. Most people do not remember the procedure due to the medication. You will probably remain drowsy and may even sleep for a short time after the procedure.

If this is an outpatient procedure, you will remain in the department for at least one hour after the procedure has been completed. The doctor will discuss his or her findings with you and your family members. You will be given written instructions for home care upon discharge.